World of Glasses

    Denver Blue Blocker Sun Readers

    £9.99

    • UV Protected Lenses BS EN ISO 12312-1:2013
    •  Filter Category 2 (Blue Blocker)
    • Polycarbonate Frame
    • Fully Sprung Hinges for Comfort and Durability
    • Moulded Nose piece
    • Scratch-resistant acrylic lenses
    • Available in +1.50 to +3.0 strengths in .50 increments
    • Available in Black
    • Unisex
    • Tested to BS EN 14139:2010

    These Yellow Lens Blue Blocker Sun readers block high amounts of blue light to heighten contrast and visual acuity. Sometimes called “Blue Blockers” they are particularly useful to improve contrast on grass and against blue skies.

    £9.99
    Strength +1.50 +2.00 +2.50 +3.00
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    Description

    • UV Protected Lenses BS EN ISO 12312-1:2013
    •  Filter Category 2 (Blue Blocker)
    • Polycarbonate Frame
    • Fully Sprung Hinges for Comfort and Durability
    • Moulded Nose piece
    • Scratch-resistant acrylic lenses
    • Available in +1.50 to +3.0 strengths in .50 increments
    • Available in Black
    • Unisex
    • Tested to BS EN 14139:2010

    These Yellow Lens Blue Blocker Sun readers block high amounts of blue light to heighten contrast and visual acuity. Sometimes called “Blue Blockers” they are particularly useful to improve contrast on grass and against blue skies.

    They are excellent for Sports too : baseball, cycling, fishing (especially in waters with grassy bottoms), golf, hunting, skiing, water sports.

    Sunlight contains red, orange, yellow, green and blue light rays and many shades of each of these colors, depending on the energy and wavelength of the individual rays (also called electromagnetic radiation). Combined, this spectrum of colored light rays creates what we call “white light” or sunlight.

    Without getting into complicated physics, there is an inverse relationship between the wavelength of light rays and the amount of energy they contain. Light rays that have relatively long wavelengths contain less energy, and those with short wavelengths have more energy. Rays on the red end of the visible light spectrum have longer wavelengths and, therefore, less energy. Rays on the blue end of the spectrum have shorter wavelengths and more energy. The electromagnetic rays just beyond the red end of the visible light spectrum are called infrared — they are warming, but invisible. (The “warming lamps” you see keeping food warm at your local eatery emit infrared radiation. But these lamps also emit visible red light so people know they are on! The same is true for other types of heat lamps.) On the other end of the visible light spectrum, blue light rays with the shortest wavelengths (and highest energy) are sometimes called blue-violet or violet light. This is why the invisible electromagnetic rays just beyond the visible light spectrum are called ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

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